Strung Out on Jargon

Keith Haring, (American, 1958-1990) Prayer card with Saint; Tony Shafrazi Gallery, 1987 Marker on printed cardstock and paper. Signed and dated: K. Haring 87.

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Glam Rock, Wrestlers And Our Family Trees: Jeremy Deller Finds Art In an Industrial Past – “The Turner prizewinner’s obsession with the history of the British people and the growth of our cities and urban culture shines through in a fascinating, quirky exhibition in Manchester” If you’re interested, another interview with Deller from 2010, from the Sylvielin’s Blog site.

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Robert Rauschenberg, Bellini #1, 1986. Andrea Previtali, Allegory of Fortune (formerly attributed to Giovanni Bellini), 16th Century, oil on panel, Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice. Intaglio with photogravure in colors, on Arches paper, the full sheet, signed, dated ‘86’ and annotated ‘TP’ in pencil (a trial proof, the edition was 36 and 7 artist’s proofs), published by Universal Limited Art Editions, West Islip, New York (with their blindstamp).

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The Two Cultures of Contemporary Art

The Two Cultures of Contemporary Art

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Young People Are Not as Digitally Native as You Think

Young People Are Not as Digitally Native as You Think

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The Forgotten: Mr. Monster – “Lon Chaney didn’t speak during early childhood, as his parents were deaf and mute, and he communicated with them via sign language. When silent movies came along, he was a natural. And at the end of his life, stricken with throat cancer, he lost his voice and again relied on pantomime to make himself understood. He came from silence and went back to silence.”

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Moto Guzzi Works Racer and Carlo Guzzi in Moto Guzzi Factory Wind Tunnel, Mandello del Lario, Lombardy, Italy 1952

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Fashion Is ephemeral. Art Is Eternal

Fashion Is ephemeral. Art Is Eternal

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First Listen: Patrick Cowley, ‘School Daze’ – “Patrick Cowley is the disco equivalent of a Jimi Hendrix or a Janis Joplin — an electronic-music trailblazer who died while his records were packing dance floors and setting trends. A synthesizer player who got his big break in the late-’70s backing and writing hits for gender-bending diva Sylvester, Cowley helped invent hi-NRG, a synth-driven Eurodisco offshoot targeted to a gay audience for whom disco never perished. Fast and intense, hi-NRG suggested an otherworldly future that lay over the rainbow, far away from anti-gay crusader Anita Bryant, Harvey Milk assassin Dan White and, indeed, the plague that had only begun to claim disco’s original dancers and DJs. The utopianism of “Stars,” a 1979 disco hit Cowley wrote for Sylvester, may have connected the musician to his hippie forebears, but unlike Hendrix or Joplin, Cowley lacked a self-destructive streak; he was simply one of the first to die of AIDS, in 1982 — before it even had a name, before there were guidelines governing safe sex and the rest”

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Instagram and Fashion, Your Future Dreams Is a Hashtag Stream

Instagram and Fashion, Your Future Dreams Is a Hashtag Stream

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Frankenstein (Realart, R-1951). Half Sheet Movie Poster – Ghouls and gravediggers, all in a glowing gangrene color palette. The studio acquired the reissue rights to the Universal Studios film library in 1948, and the studio insisted on creating new and exciting posters, like this one. Boris Karloff is The Monster, with Colin Clive and Dwight Frye exhuming the corpses from which they will piece him together!

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Jerry Saltz on Art’s Insidious New Cliché: Neo-Mannerism – “Looking at 2-D work, I’m this close to that old Carter-administration-era croak of “Painting is dead.” Again…Then there are all the fussy collages of cut-up porn, furniture catalogues, ads, Internet screen-grabs, modernist architecture, urban wastelands, endangered species, sixties protests, or (of course) art-historical jpegs. We also see small-scale, colored, neatly framed, or cut-up photographs about photography. All of this Neo-Mannerism is an art of infinite regress. Defensive. Predictable. Safe. Well-defended. Loved by brainy magazines, websites, and curators but so far up its own ass that it can’t breathe.”

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The New York Times Asks, What’s Your Favorite Punk Film? Typical glaring omissions like Desperate Teenage Lovedolls, Radio One, and Decline of Western Civ and so forth but for me, hands down it’s Jubilee, Derek Jarman’s 1978 Masterpiece.  (Watch a Free Copy Now On Vimeo) When Queen Elizabeth I asks her court alchemist to show her England in the future, she’s transported 400 years to a post-apocalyptic wasteland of roving girl gangs, an all-powerful media mogul, fascistic police, scattered filth, and twisted sex. Jarman channeled political dissent and artistic daring into a revolutionary blend of history, fantasy, uninhibited punk petulance, coupled with musical and cinematic experimentation, satire, anger, fashion and philosophy.

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“I have seen the future of the web and it looks like bad public access television.” said Robert P. Libbon. Film still from Jarman’s Jubilee, this is 1978, future forward indeed.

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David Byrne: ‘The Internet Will Suck All Creative Content Out of The World’

David Byrne: ‘The Internet Will Suck All Creative Content Out of The World’

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House of GIFs – What happens when everyone’s favorite image format -The Gif-is used for something more than funny animals and WTF moments? Artist Tom Hancock is attempting to push the medium into a respected art form with an interactive GIF house titled IDLE SELF.

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Robert Frank, Astor Place, NYC, 1948 (gelatin silver print, printed c. 1970)

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